Financial Freedom: A Proven Path outlet sale to All the Money online sale You Will Ever Need outlet sale

Financial Freedom: A Proven Path outlet sale to All the Money online sale You Will Ever Need outlet sale

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Description

Product Description

The International Bestseller

"This book blew my mind. More importantly, it made financial independence seem achievableI read Financial Freedom three times, cover-to-cover." 
Lifehacker

Money is unlimited. Time is not. Become financially independent as fast as possible.


In 2010, 24-year old Grant Sabatier woke up to find he had $2.26 in his bank account. Five years later, he had a net worth of over $1.25 million, and CNBC began calling him "the Millennial Millionaire." By age 30, he had reached financial independence. Along the way he uncovered that most of the accepted wisdom about money, work, and retirement is either incorrect, incomplete, or so old-school it''s obsolete.

Financial Freedom is a step-by-step path to make more money in less time, so you have more time for the things you love. It challenges the accepted narrative of spending decades working a traditional 9 to 5 job, pinching pennies, and finally earning the right to retirement at age 65, and instead offers readers an alternative: forget everything you''ve ever learned about money so that you can actually live the life you want.

Sabatier offers surprising, counter-intuitive advice on topics such as how to:

*
  Create profitable side hustles that you can turn into passive income streams or full-time businesses
*  Save money without giving up what makes you happy
*  Negotiate more out of your employer than you thought possible
*  Travel the world for less
*  Live for free--or better yet, make money on your living situation
*  Create a simple, money-making portfolio that only needs minor adjustments
*  Think creatively--there are so many ways to make money, but we don''t see them.

But most importantly, Sabatier highlights that, while one''s ability to make money is limitless, one''s time is not. There''s also a limit to how much you can save, but not to how much money you can make. No one should spend precious years working at a job they dislike or worrying about how to make ends meet. Perhaps the biggest surprise: You need less money to "retire" at age 30 than you do at age 65.

Financial Freedom is not merely a laundry list of advice to follow to get rich quick--it''s a practical roadmap to living life on one''s own terms, as soon as possible.

Review

" Financial Freedom is about a lot more than money, it’s about living a richer life."
—David Bach, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Automatic Millionaire & The Latte Factor

"Grant''s genius is on full display in the entrepreneurial attitudes and strategies in this practical, fiercely focused book. Financial Freedom fills a major gap in  Your Money or Your Life that I didn''t even realize was there. Thank you!" 
—from the foreword by Vicki Robin, New York Times bestselling co-author of Your Money or Your Life

"Simply put, this book will help you make money. You''ll also learn to save, invest, and better manage your money—all good things! I hope you have the foresight to read and apply its many lessons." 
—Chris Guillebeau, New York Times bestselling author of Side Hustle and The $100 Startup

" Financial Freedom will transform your relationship with money."
—Joshua Becker, Founder of Becoming Minimalist and Simple Money Magazine

" Financial Freedom is a comprehensive guide to building tangible wealth that you can deploy immediately to give yourself real options in life. You''ll both learn something and be inspired by Grant, whether you are brand new to the concept of financial freedom, or well on your way already."
—Scott Trench, Author of Set For Life and and Host of the BiggerPockets Money Show Podcast

"Grant Sabatier is a bold, new voice for this country''s next generation -- a generation that chafes at mounting debt, rejects traditional modes of work, and longs for financial freedom. In this comprehensive money manual, Sabatier blends deep wisdom with proven action steps. He shows how to mold your mindset so that you can make the most of your dollars and your hours. Best of all, he provides a blueprint so that you can build the rich life you''ve always wished for."
—J.D. Roth, Creator of Get Rich Slowly and author of Your Money

"Eminently practical...A worthwhile purchase for anyone, not just aspiring millionaires, who feels overwhelmed by finances."
Publishers Weekly

Financial Freedom changed my life. Reading it showed me a new way of looking at money and work that''s opened my eyes to how life ought to be lived. Grant’s book will not only guide you to financial freedom, it’ll teach you to stop being limited by conventions and what you think you can and cannot achieve." 
 —Coryanne Hicks, U.S. News & World Report

"This book blew my mind."
—Lifehacker 

About the Author

Grant Sabatier is the creator of MillennialMoney.com, which has reached over 10 million readers. He writes about personal finance, investing, entrepreneurship, and mindfulness and hosts the Financial Freedom podcast. Sabatier graduated from the University of Chicago and has been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, NPR, Money magazine, and many others. When not traveling in his VW Camper, he lives in New York City.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1
Money Is Freedom
How I Went from $2.26 to $1 Million in Five Years

Grant, wake up!" my mom yelled to me from the bottom of the stairs. It was eleven a.m., and I''d slept in-again. Waking up in my childhood bedroom, I felt like I was back in middle school, but I was actually twenty-four years old, unemployed, and living with my parents-a situation all too familiar to millennials like me.

It was August 2010. I''d moved back home two months earlier after being laid off from my job as a researcher at a newspaper. My parents had told me I could crash at home but that I needed to be out in three months and they weren''t going to give me a dime. Every night at dinner, they asked how my job search was going, looking at me skeptically as I tried to avoid eye contact.

The truth is, I''d recently stopped applying to jobs. I''d sent out over two hundred resumes in the past month alone and hadn''t gotten a single call back. You can send only so many resumes into the abyss before it starts crushing your soul.

As I rolled over in bed that August morning, I tried to think about anything other than my current financial situation. In any case, I had an even more primal desire: I was craving a Chipotle burrito. I knew I was getting low on funds, so reluctantly I checked my account balance on my phone. The savings account I''d labeled do not touch right after I''d lost my job had $0.01 in it. My checking account balance was scarcely better: $2.26, barely enough to afford a side of guacamole, let alone a whole burrito. I took a screenshot of my account to remember this feeling and serve as motivation for the future. Eventually I hung the picture in my closet as a daily reminder, and I still see it every morning.

Defeated but still hungry, I made myself a turkey sandwich and headed outside to the backyard. It was an unseasonably cool summer day in the D.C. suburbs, the sounds of lawn mowers and neighborhood kids enjoying the last week of summer vacation filling the air.

I threw myself down on the grass, just as I''d done so many times as a kid. As I looked up into the clear blue sky, pierced only by the occasional plane headed to Washington National Airport, I contemplated how I''d arrived at this point. I''d always done what I was "supposed" to do. I''d gone to a top university, worked hard, gotten good grades, and even managed to get a job offer before I graduated. After graduation, I started working for an analytics company and assumed I was now on the path to building wealth and becoming a successful adult. But as it turned out, I was making a huge trade-off.

My first job was located in a sterile office park two hours away from where I lived. The windows in my building didn''t open, and the office manager couldn''t be bothered to replace the air filters, so the air was always stale. I sat in a four-foot-wide half cubicle under fluorescent lights so bright they were almost blinding. I was so worried about doing a good job and making sure my boss liked me that, by the time I got home, I was too wiped out to do anything fun. I''d zone out in front of the TV and overeat out of boredom. I gained twenty pounds, and even though I was tired all the time, I had trouble sleeping because I was too anxious about the next day. At 4:50 a.m., the alarm would go off, and I''d crawl out of bed to repeat the routine once again. As the day wore on, I''d watch the minutes of my life tick by on my computer clock.

"You''ll get used to it," my dad told me by way of encouragement when I called to complain. "Welcome to the real world."

I tried to convince myself that this would all be worth it, that every minute I spent behind that desk and every dollar I earned was one minute and one dollar closer to some distant dream future in which I could live the life I wanted to live. But in reality, I was actually just trading my time for enough money to pay my bills. I got paid twice a month and was living paycheck to paycheck. The first check went directly to rent, while the second went to paying off my credit card balance, which always seemed to keep going up. I told myself I would save money at the end of the month, but I actually ended up spending more than I was making. I worked hard all week, so I went out and spent recklessly on the weekend. Work hard, play hard, right? I assured myself I would save money next month. That I would save money when I was making more money. That I would save money when I was older.

Then, just six months after I started my job, I got fired because I wasn''t making the company enough money. I later did the math and realized that in those six months, I''d traded 1,400 hours of my life for $15,500 after taxes. And not only did I have nothing left, I owed $12,000 in credit card debt.

Over the next two years I bounced between unemployment and a few other jobs, but I still never managed to save anything. I was so worried about money that I started suffering from debilitating anxiety attacks so powerful that my heart felt like it would stop beating and I literally thought I was going to die. I was letting the best hours of my life during the best years of my life burn out with each biweekly paycheck.

It sucked, but I was far from alone in my plight. According to Gallup''s annual survey of the American Workforce in 2017, 70 percent of employees in the United States are disengaged at work. Meanwhile, 69 percent of Americans have less than $1,000 in savings and live one disaster away from poverty, bankruptcy, or crippling debt.

When the Great Recession hit, I lost my job again. By the time I showed up back on my parents'' doorstep, after three years in the working world, I had traded 4,700 hours of my life for $87,000 after taxes. And besides that $2.26, I had absolutely nothing to show for it. I didn''t even have my prized Volkswagen camper van anymore because I''d sold it six months before just to make ends meet.

As I lay there in the backyard, my thoughts of the past turned to thoughts of the future. As I considered my options, I saw the next forty years-the best years of my life-stretched out before me. I imagined myself stuck in another bleak office, in another nondescript office park, in another stifling cubicle. If I somehow managed to save enough of my salary after all my bills were paid, I might be able to retire in my sixties.

Given the trends of my generation, however, even that dismal prospect seemed unlikely. Among the 83 million millennials in the United States, the average income is $35,592 per year, less than half of what our parents made at our age when adjusted for inflation. With an average of $36,000 in student loan debt, most of us don''t get out of debt for years, let alone start to save any real money.

If we look closely at these numbers, it''s no wonder we aren''t saving enough to retire in even three to four decades. While investment guides generally recommend you sock away 10 to 15 percent of your income (even though, as I''d later learn, that definitely isn''t enough), millennials under twenty-five are saving only 3.9 percent of their income for retirement, while older millennials, those aged twenty-five to thirty-four, are saving 5.35 percent. This will make it impossible for most of us to ever retire. Literally impossible!

In case that doesn''t scare you enough, who knows how decisions by our government and shifts in the economy will affect our futures? Will Social Security even be around in forty years? Will we be able to afford healthcare as costs go up and as our need for it becomes greater? Inflation isn''t slowing down anytime soon, meaning our paltry savings will end up being worth even less than it is today. What are we supposed to do? Work until we fall down dead at our desks? We are on our own.

I realized that doing everything I was "supposed" to do wouldn''t guarantee anything, even retirement in forty-plus years. What kind of life is that? I didn''t want to spend my days in a job I hated just so I could get by. I wanted to feel passionate about my work and love my life.

I didn''t want to worry about money all the time or depend on a boss who might decide to fire me at any minute, just so I could pay my rent. I wanted to be in control of my own income and time. I didn''t want to put off traveling the world because I couldn''t afford it or I was allowed only ten days of vacation a year. I wanted to be able to have enough time to really explore the world. I didn''t want to spend the most precious moments of my future kids'' lives in an office. I wanted to be there to watch them grow and help them figure out how to realize their own dreams.

And I didn''t want to wake up at sixty-five and realize that I''d traded more than seventy thousand hours of my life working a nine-to-five for . . . what?

I wanted more money. I wanted more life.

I realized that if I wanted something different, I was going to have to do something different. So that day, lying in the grass, I set two seemingly unrealistic goals: to save $1 million and to "retire" as quickly as possible.

I didn''t know how I was going to do it-or even if I was going to be able to do it-but I spent the next five years doing everything I could to make it happen. I read every personal finance book and investing guide I could get my hands on. I worked a nine-to-five job for benefits and connections, but then launched two companies and started several side hustles to earn extra income. I saved 25 percent, then 40 percent, then up to 80 percent of my income some months and put that money to work in the stock market so it could grow. And I figured out how I could optimize my lifestyle to maximize my income and savings, and have a lot of fun along the way.

Fast-forward five years later to 2015, and I had a net worth of over $1 million. I didn''t win the lottery or come into some surprise inheritance. I didn''t strike it rich on some hot new app that I sold to Google for a billion dollars. I didn''t hustle for the mob or rob any banks. I simply learned everything I could, questioned all the popular advice about money I came across, and maximized the value of my time through a combination of personal finance, entrepreneurship, and investing-three things absolutely anyone, even someone with $2.26 in the bank and a lack of marketable skills, can learn to do on their own.

I''ll admit it wasn''t easy. In fact, it was the hardest thing I''ve ever done in my life. But not for the reasons you may think. The strategies I used require some effort and discipline, but they aren''t complicated. What made my journey difficult was that it required me to step outside my comfort zone, take some calculated risks, and do things that no one else around me was doing, that no one I knew had done. A lot of people thought I was crazy, and even my girlfriend wouldn''t come over to visit my crappy but inexpensive apartment. I definitely made decisions that many people wouldn''t even consider. I was living on the edge, but I had a mission and that kept me motivated. I also learned an insane amount about how almost anyone can find ways to save and make more money.

One of the most profound lessons I''ve learned along the way is that most of the "accepted wisdom" about money, work, and retirement is either incorrect, incomplete, or so old-school it''s obsolete. We''ve accepted this version of the "real world" because it''s what others have done for generations, but it just doesn''t work anymore-unless you maybe want to retire in thirty to forty years. Things have changed, and despite all the pessimism surrounding the financial prospects for so many people today, it''s actually never been easier to make more money, manage your own money, and live a life free from the typical nine-to-five. The challenge is in opening yourself up to the opportunity, questioning the advice and example of others, and learning to do things differently even if people think you''re crazy.

Most of what''s in this book wasn''t even possible ten years ago. None of it is taught in schools, and most people you know aren''t even aware that it''s possible. I learned it only because I made it my mission to do so and dedicated thousands and thousands of hours to learning everything I could, testing it for myself, and making mistakes from which I could learn. Once I realized how much knowledge I had gained, I knew I needed to share it with the world.

In 2015, soon after I reached my goal of saving $1 million, I started MillennialMoney.com to build a community and share my strategies, habits, and hacks to build wealth as quickly as possible. Over the past three years more than 10 million people have visited Millennial Money or listened to my podcast, and tens of thousands have reached out to me directly to ask questions and share their own financial successes. I recently heard from Victor, who was able to get a $60,000 raise; Mia, who sold her first $20,000 side-hustle engagement; Eric, who increased his savings rate from 3 percent to 40 percent in two months; and Melissa, who lives for free in million-dollar mansions thanks to information she learned on the site.

Many more have been able to launch profitable side hustles, start investing, negotiate life-changing work-remote opportunities, leave their full-time jobs to pursue their passions. Many have fast-tracked their financial freedom and are now on pace to retire in ten years or less, decades earlier than they otherwise would have been if they hadn''t implemented these strategies. While the site has proved to be a great resource, I still get asked all the time "How, exactly, did you do it?" The answer to that question is much too long to be explained in a single blog post, which is why I decided to write this book.

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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
957 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Nunya Biznass
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mixed Review. Some good info, some dangerous advice. Podcast promo better than book.
Reviewed in the United States on February 11, 2019
Overall, I give this book 3 out of 5 stars. While there were definitely some useful and helpful ideas, there was also some dangerous and flat out terrible advice. Overall, the podcast appearances promoting the book and the information discussed on those podcasts was much... See more
Overall, I give this book 3 out of 5 stars. While there were definitely some useful and helpful ideas, there was also some dangerous and flat out terrible advice. Overall, the podcast appearances promoting the book and the information discussed on those podcasts was much more impactful than the book itself in my opinion.

The Good/Helpful:
- Some useful websites for side hustles
- Unique and powerful ways to change your mindset
- Emphasis on the importance of doing as much as possible as soon as possible
- Some general guidelines around categorical spending

The Bad/Dangerous
- Limited discussion until the end of the book (p. 290) about Sequence of Return Risk. This is something few people understand and it is flat out dangerous to lead someone to potentially believe that they can retire decades earlier than "standard/normal retirement age" with significantly less money than they would supposedly otherwise need to accumulate by age 65, immediately starting withdrawing from these funds, and that their money will likely double, triple, or quadruple by the time they''re much older. Yes, this is possible IF someone can remain flexible (on taking withdrawals from their assets, on generating income in "retirement"), IF someone has alternate income sources, IF market conditions are generally favorable during at least the first decade of "retirement," etc., but there is a major risk here as well. The author does mention these items and does provide a few cautionary words, but I do not think this was stressed enough for the average reader to truly understand the complete impact/considerations. I feel like most people will think, "oh, awesome, I can retire in my 30s with $1.25M, starting taking withdrawals right away, never run out of money, and my portfolio will be worth multiples of the $1.25M in my later years." More time should be spent discussing sequence of return risk.
- Asset Allocation Metrics Are Questionable: p.235 suggests only a 5% international allocation. For most investors, especially younger ones with likely higher risk tolerances, this is unnecessarily low.
- Qualified Dividends Categorization: p. 252 suggests that whether or not dividends are qualified (versus ordinary) is based on the length of time a stock is held. Not true.
- Holding Bonds/Fixed Income in Taxable Accounts: p. 254 says [...] you will keep your tax burden as low as possible at the end of each year, since bonds typically have lower returns than stocks." Really?!? Bonds income is taxed as ordinary income. Why would you voluntarily hold bonds in a taxable account and pay ordinary income taxes? Anyone who knows anything about financial planning knows that, generally speaking, it makes sense to hold growth-oriented investments, like stocks, in a taxable brokerage account (due to more favorable taxation) and fixed income investments like bonds in tax-deferred plans (since bonds are taxed at ordinary income and all funds coming out of pre-tax plans are going to be taxed at ordinary income tax rates anyway). It''s not just about returns from the standpoint of capital appreciation, but total returns, which include dividend income, interest income, etc. While stocks may increase in value faster than/more than stocks over a long period of time, that does NOT mean you should hold bonds in a taxable account!
- Bonds vs. Bond Funds: p. 289 says "One nice feature of bonds is that you know exactly how your bond investments will grow each year, so the income is guaranteed." Is it? No, no it''s not at all - especially if you''re using bond FUNDS like the author suggests. If you hold an actual bond to maturity, it works slightly differently. Either way, that bond income is not "guaranteed."

I think the author means well and I think his story of going from dead broke to millionaire in 5 years is awesome. As he mentions, he did that with some sacrifices, including personal relationships. I wish he would have spend more time digging into this and its importance, as I feel like many people struggle with this. I think it''s a great book for him to tell his story and what worked for him, but I think he should leave the financial advice to those that are much more familiar with how this stuff works. If you''re looking for a similar book, but much better, I would recommend Set for Life by Scott Trench. For those interested in real estate, the section in this book on real estate is generally weak in my opinion. I agree with the author''s position on putting less than 20% down in certain situations - his examples of why on this are right on. In general, though, I would suggest checking out BiggerPockets for in-depth real estate investing info.
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JJ Jank
3.0 out of 5 stars
Keep the habits and the income advice, toss the tax stuff
Reviewed in the United States on February 10, 2019
There’s some good advice in here, and interesting ways both to save and make money that are very helpful. Unfortunately, much of the tax information is wrong. Financial freedom is sometimes known as “early retirement”. However, since most early retirees keep working in... See more
There’s some good advice in here, and interesting ways both to save and make money that are very helpful. Unfortunately, much of the tax information is wrong.
Financial freedom is sometimes known as “early retirement”. However, since most early retirees keep working in some capacity, financial freedom is a better term. In order to do this, you need to be very focused, because your savings rate has to be 50% or higher to achieve freedom in a short period of time. Some people are able to do this, and that’s great. But many can’t.
You also need favorable stock returns. I think there’s a reason that financial freedom is a recent phenomenon, and that’s due to the stock market’s performance since 2009. It’s obvious the author has only been investing during this long bull run. He pays lip service to market drops, but doesn’t understand how frightened people get when their net worth is suddenly half what it was six months ago.
I personally have been working and investing through a couple of recessions – the tech boom and bust, and the recent Great Recession. Most people got nervous, went to cash, stopped contributing, etc., during these periods. The past investing decade has been really smooth. I’m not sure how everyone who achieved financial freedom will feel when we get back to more normal volatility.
The author spends time on the importance of compounding early in the book, which is great. He makes a minor mistake, saying stock growth is called interest. Interest is paid on bonds. He explains how to arrive at your “number” – how much you need so you don’t have to work for the rest of your life.
He knocks financial advisors for arriving at a specific number for retirement, which can’t be known in advance… yet here we are, calculating the number. He also mentions that this should be recalculated as you go, which is correct, and also what financial planners advise.
Reducing your current lifestyle can result in a smaller number, which means you have to save less money. He gives good examples for how to do so. It’s a great point, to stay off the hedonic treadmill or get off it if you’re already there. The author also discusses about habits, which is usually necessary for success.
Unfortunately, in so doing he gives a very bad piece of advice, which is to look at your net worth daily. Like I said, obviously he’s never invested through a recession. A disadvantage for an author who’s not in finance is that they probably haven’t seen a lot of research.
And the research is clear. The more people look at their accounts, the more they trade, and the lower their return. I encourage absolutely no one to follow this particular piece of advice!
However, it’s not a bad idea to look at your finances in terms of income and expenses daily. You have control of that to a large extent. You have no control over the market, and constantly monitoring that can prevent you from making good decisions.
The book’s ideas about using your 9-to-5 as a launch pad are good. He recommends maximizing all the benefits you can get from your job, which will definitely help you save money. Also, use the day job to diversify skills, which makes it easier to side hustle. Take advantage of those conferences your manager send you to, so you can network and learn new things. He advises understanding what your actual hourly rate is, so when you’re making purchases you can think how much work you have to do to pay it off. Or how it will slow down reaching financial freedom. Invest early and often!
Reducing the big costs – transportation, housing, food – has a big effect on lowering expenses and getting to freedom faster. He offers some interesting ideas on maximizing these options. It turns out that renting your place out (or a room out) is now called a house hack.
The stock investing part is a mix of decent, traditional advice: low fees, diversify, remember a long term goal like retirement needs higher returns like stocks; and other well-known buy-and-hold type advice. Unfortunately this is mingled with incorrect statements and some bad examples and explanations.
Comparing investing in a stock index fund to an advisor charging a fee on assets, using active funds, to claim that advisors cost too much is disingenuous at best. Many advisors I know use index funds, not active funds. Usually the cost of asset management starts dropping once you have $1 million as well.
And yes, some people are perfectly fine investing by themselves. They’re logical enough when it comes to investments to make good decisions.
But many people need financial advisors to help them avoid making bad decisions, like selling while the market’s down. I’ve talked enough clients off the ledge to know.
The author is opposed to charging a fee for assets under management (AUM). For a lot of beginning investors, AUM doesn’t work because they don’t have enough in assets. He makes the point that the manager will make money even if the assets go down. True. But the manager’s incentives are lined up with yours: the more your money grows, the more they get paid. That’s not necessarily the case with other way that fees are charged.
I’m not endorsing AUM over other methods! The industry is moving toward other ways of charging money. However, there are investors who really benefit from a manager who charges on AUM.
He gets dividend taxation wrong. His explanation doesn’t make a lot of sense, but he seems to be saying that you’re taxed on withdrawal. It doesn’t matter how you take the dividend – in stock, reinvested, cash, whatever. The dividend is distributed to you and so you are taxed on it in the year you receive it. It doesn’t matter what you do with it.
He recommends leveraged munis, for what reason I cannot fathom. Also, munis are only useful in taxable accounts, and mostly useful for those in high tax brackets.
Speaking of bonds, the author recommends steadily high-returning bonds. Huh? If you’re getting a high return, they’re probably high-yield bonds, so they don’t protect you against market drops like bonds with lower returns do.
There’s a lot of discussion in the book about how much you could take out in capital gains if you’re married filing jointly (MFJ), and I could not figure out what he was talking about. I finally realized that he didn’t understand the capital gains tax table.
Your capital gains tax rate depends on your ordinary income. In other words, the tax table shows what the capital gain tax is according to your income. Up to $77,000 or so the cap gains tax rate is zero, for a couple who’s MFJ. The author seems to think that you can take $77k of cap gains per year without any tax, and then you can take however much in rental income (or other income) on top. That’s not the way it works.
His discussion of taxable accounts isn’t wrong, but it is a little…slippery. He claims you get taxed twice on these accounts. True, you contribute after-tax income, and when you sell, there is tax. But you’re only taxed on the gains, not what you contributed, and it’s taxed at the capital gains rate which is lower than ordinary income.
The book’s real estate section is provides good advice in how to find a good investment property, what to look for in a property, buying only what you can afford and not what the mortgage broker tells you, etc. However, it is wrong when it comes to taxes.
The author doesn’t understand the new tax bill, which had a significant effect on mortgage interest deduction. The standard deduction was raised, but the mortgage interest deduction is an itemized deduction. You can take either the standard deduction, or you can itemize. You cannot do both, as he implies you can in the book.
This would be a better book if the author ran it by someone who knows about taxes, like an accountant or financial planner. But other than that, I found good tips in here.
So I think, overall, the message is actually pretty helpful. Even if you’re at an age where that early retirement ship has sailed, you might still get some good ideas for making more money and reducing expenses. The author discusses how good habits, executed consistently, will get you to where you want to go. Most of the habits, with the one huge exception of checking your net worth daily, are good ones to adopt.
153 people found this helpful
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Life Adventurer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Highly recommended
Reviewed in the United States on February 5, 2019
I devoured this book over the weekend. Grant does an incredible job with the “why” and the “how” of reaching financial independence. I believe he is going to impact a lot of lives with this book.
50 people found this helpful
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Jason Kendrick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Financial Awakening
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2019
Financial Freedom by Grant Sabatier has woken me up from years of brainwashing by the status quo model of creating wealth. Grant not only shares his own experience of how he created financial independence early he provides the strategy and tools for me to do the same. As a... See more
Financial Freedom by Grant Sabatier has woken me up from years of brainwashing by the status quo model of creating wealth. Grant not only shares his own experience of how he created financial independence early he provides the strategy and tools for me to do the same. As a full time single father, I consider this book to be the most important handbook to creating financial stability for myself and other parents or single adults. Thank you Grant.
38 people found this helpful
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Bakari Chavanu
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very useful, especially for millennials
Reviewed in the United States on February 24, 2019
I''ve read several books about personal finance, and this is one of the few that provides a roadmap to financial independence. The ideal audience for this book is someone fresh out of college with a job making a decent middle class income. Grant provides... See more
I''ve read several books about personal finance, and this is one of the few that provides a roadmap to financial independence.

The ideal audience for this book is someone fresh out of college with a job making a decent middle class income. Grant provides strategies for maximizing your income and increasing your savings, which by the way is the best way to grow your wealth. The bottom line is always keep your expenses as low as possible, and spend only what you have to. Save and invest 20-50% of your income using the recommendations in the book.

I do though disagree with a few of Grant''s recommendations: I think keeping a budget is very important. I''ve been using YouNeedABudget for almost three years now, and it has enabled me to increase my cash flow and never have to pay interests on my credit cards. I use YNAB to budget for my true expenses, and to maintain a one month buffer of my expenses. By keeping a budget, I paid off my $12k car loan in 14 months using my regular income and getting paid to build a couple of websites, as Grant talks about his book.

So if you''re not disciplined about managing your money (which means you''re living paycheck to paycheck, you don''t have a decent emergency fund, and you''re not budgeting for your true expenses), then you need to learn the budget to zero method.

Reading Financial Freedom has though inspired me to save $10-$12k this year and in years to come, and to start investing a portion of that money in a ROTH IRA account. I get a salaried income and no company 401k, so I''ll need to develop more sources of passive income.

I wish I read about personal finance growing up, because it would have made a huge difference in my financial life. Financial Freedom is must read, and good guide to return to when you can start investing. But it''s not the only book you should read about personal finance. Try to read at least three books a year on the subject, because handling your money and increasing your wealth is very important, especially in capitalist society like the U.S..
19 people found this helpful
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Ricardo Arbona
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Different approach to personal finance
Reviewed in the United States on February 10, 2019
I usually don''t take the time to write a review and this particular case wanted to do it; although, I''m not done reading. What like about this book is that is not only about how to manage personal finance. It''s also about challenging they way people think about money and... See more
I usually don''t take the time to write a review and this particular case wanted to do it; although, I''m not done reading. What like about this book is that is not only about how to manage personal finance. It''s also about challenging they way people think about money and how make money. In today''s society people won''t get ahead by just following a money management plan, but by mastering it and increasing income. This a great guide to define what this means for you and how to go about it. Very easy to read book!
26 people found this helpful
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AppleADay
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Finally! A useful guide to personal finance!
Reviewed in the United States on December 14, 2020
This book actually takes you through the numbers of how he got to financial freedom/wealth. Unlike so many other books its not just full of common sense advice, most of it is applicable to YOU (and me). I liked so many things about this book that I bought one for every... See more
This book actually takes you through the numbers of how he got to financial freedom/wealth. Unlike so many other books its not just full of common sense advice, most of it is applicable to YOU (and me). I liked so many things about this book that I bought one for every member of my family, honestly I bought 8 copies. I''d stay away however if you are easily overwhelmed by numbers, if you are a complete novice, or if you want specific investing advice.

Pros:
- focuses on the numbers that back up his approach to financial freedom & done in a step-by-step process starting with how you define what financial freedom is for you, figuring out the number in which you need to achieve that goal then finally goes into HOW to get there, including multiple up-to-date options like side hustles, optimizing your regular job, investing real estate, the stock market and more.
- unique and applicable way to apply this to your life. I actually feel like i got a lot out of this book.

Cons:
- He assumes a certain level of financial understanding, if you are a complete novice or don''t understand the terminology probably you should wait on this one.
- Its for a broad audience, if you have a special situation that you have a few questions on this is not the book.
- beginning is a lot of math and soul searching. If you want a get-rich-quick or "just follow these 3 steps" this is not it. You really have to do what he asks you to do, which involves lots of thinking & heart-to-heart with yourself and a calculator. To be honest- I felt this part of the book was too long-- necessary but long.

I felt this was a perfect companion book, to "Your Money or Your Life." With these two books you are probably set for some serious changes in your financial world.
5 people found this helpful
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Priscilla P.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Buy This!
Reviewed in the United States on February 7, 2019
I love reading stories of people accomplishing AMAZING things with sheer determination and grit. To go from basically nothing to 1.25 million by 30 is CRAZY!! Reading this blueprint, so my husband I can continue to strive towards our goals,is more helpful than I thought it... See more
I love reading stories of people accomplishing AMAZING things with sheer determination and grit. To go from basically nothing to 1.25 million by 30 is CRAZY!! Reading this blueprint, so my husband I can continue to strive towards our goals,is more helpful than I thought it would be. I’m still reading it, but I can already tell how much valuable content we will get from this book. As millennials ourselves, I have to say that you are truly an inspiration for us. Thank you!

Edit: Love all the information on side hustling and hacking your 9-5. I think that is a major key to being able to “retire” early or become FI and not having to withdrawal principal from your portfolio. I see some of the reviews that recommend seeing professionals for tax advice and such. While it’s true that it’s wise to consult professionals for things such as tax advice, estate planning etc., this is still an amazing read that will motivate people to not give into the status quo. I think he gets that point across very well. Always read as much as you can about something you are trying to achieve. That goes without saying for everything.
12 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

book lady_76
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s ok if you are under 30
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 24, 2020
Aged 44 I learnt little from this book. It''s probably good if you are 20 something and live at home with your parents and work in a job. It will definitely help you get on your feet and start saving or "sofa surfing" or pet sitting so you can live for free and save money...See more
Aged 44 I learnt little from this book. It''s probably good if you are 20 something and live at home with your parents and work in a job. It will definitely help you get on your feet and start saving or "sofa surfing" or pet sitting so you can live for free and save money while you save up for your financial freedom to retire at 35 or so. Good luck. If you already passed this age, accumulated some money, have not been working for other people only for yourself and looking for investment or money advise, if you have kids or other responsibilities - not for you sorry. I was looking for more investment advise rather than how to maximise my savings with a 9-5 job.
11 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book, would recommend
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 26, 2021
Great book, full of wonderful advice, USA based info but still a good read for an international audience. Recommend!
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Charlotte W.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Practical advice
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 17, 2021
Easy to understand, step by step practical guide to help you achieve financial independence. All concepts very well explained. Based in US but principles can be applied to savings etc worldwide
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JoJo Sevilla
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Financial freedom
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 24, 2020
Very good book on how to manage your money, expenses and liabilities, and where you can put your saving to good use
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Daniel Horseman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Life altering.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 25, 2021
This book gives sound advice that I only wish I knew ten years ago.
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